Taleba is an activist and founder of the British Sound System Collective Forum.“This album is without question the backdrop of my childhood growing up in inner-city London. When I was 12 my dad, who was and still is a sound man, used to drive me to school in Hackney and the haunting sounds of “Rasta Man Camp” used to chime continuously on our journey to and from. At the time I was annoyed, wasn’t listening, struggling with my Jamaican roots against the backdrop of British school life. But, at the same time, subconsciously absorbing every word which would later manifest itself in becoming my love and passion for reggae music. In the 80s I didn’t have any friends who I could discuss reggae music with so it was weird growing up in school, wanting to talk about this amazing album but being met with discussions on pop music and popular white British bands. So I loved reggae music in silence. I’d sneak into the front room and turn my dad's set on when he wasn’t’ home - turn the volume up and absorb the basslines to “Bobby Bobylon” – it almost felt like a defiant song that you weren’t allowed to sing but felt compelled to as you chanted ‘down Babylon’ in the chorus. I was a mere child just beginning to become socially, economically and culturally aware. British but culturally different, just beginning to understand and appreciate the importance of reggae music in terms of the legacy I grew up in but had no idea to its significance until today. Every song held a special place in my heart especially the track “What Difference Does it Make.” A poignant message, hard to understand as a child, but with time age and wisdom became an important and valuable way to tackle life’s hardships. It’s not that important - why worry about it?Move on, stay strong - the perfect track when I’m feeling as though I’m giving too much thought into my life’s issues. Even today it’s still my go to track. Ultimately it means so much to me to belong to sound system culture by blood not relation. Although I grew up in a reggae environment since birth, this album was one of my first reggae albums I really took notice of. A real introduction into wholesome roots mixed with the refreshing sounds of Studio One. If someone asked me to give them one album to introduce them to the world of reggae music this would definitely be at the top of my list. An essential album through and through.”Taleba Wax: The Custard Factory, Digbeth, Birmingham, 22nd January 2019Freddie McGregor: {quote}Bobby Bobylon{quote} released 1979Taleba Wax: The British Sound System Collective
Taleba Wax, Freddie McGregor: Bobby Bobylon

 

Taleba is an activist and founder of the British Sound System Collective Forum. 

“This album is without question the backdrop of my childhood growing up in inner-city London. When I was 12 my dad, who was and still is a sound man, used to drive me to school in Hackney and the haunting sounds of “Rasta Man Camp” used to chime continuously on our journey to and from. At the time I was annoyed, wasn’t listening, struggling with my Jamaican roots against the backdrop of British school life.  

But, at the same time, subconsciously absorbing every word which would later manifest itself in becoming my love and passion for reggae music. In the 80s I didn’t have any friends who I could discuss reggae music with so it was weird growing up in school, wanting to talk about this amazing album but being met with discussions on pop music and popular white British bands. So I loved reggae music in silence. I’d sneak into the front room and turn my dad's set on when he wasn’t’ home - turn the volume up and absorb the basslines to “Bobby Bobylon” – it almost felt like a defiant song that you weren’t allowed to sing but felt compelled to as you chanted ‘down Babylon’ in the chorus. I was a mere child just beginning to become socially, economically and culturally aware. British but culturally different, just beginning to understand and appreciate the importance of reggae music in terms of the legacy I grew up in but had no idea to its significance until today. Every song held a special place in my heart especially the track “What Difference Does it Make.” A poignant message, hard to understand as a child, but with time age and wisdom became an important and valuable way to tackle life’s hardships. It’s not that important - why worry about it? 

Move on, stay strong - the perfect track when I’m feeling as though I’m giving too much thought into my life’s issues. Even today it’s still my go to track. Ultimately it means so much to me to belong to sound system culture by blood not relation.  

Although I grew up in a reggae environment since birth, this album was one of my first reggae albums I really took notice of.  

A real introduction into wholesome roots mixed with the refreshing sounds of Studio One. If someone asked me to give them one album to introduce them to the world of reggae music this would definitely be at the top of my list. An essential album through and through.” 

Taleba Wax: The Custard Factory, Digbeth, Birmingham, 22nd January 2019 

Freddie McGregor: "Bobby Bobylon" released 1979 

Taleba Wax: The British Sound System Collective 

 

 

Johnny Marr

intro

{quote}Well, I had a short list of four - five actually, five.One is 'Glenn Gould Plays Bach' and you can see from the rather beat up condition of it. It was a gift to me when it new and I can look at the year, but I was probably not more than six or seven years old when I received that - and it's probably scratched to shit, but it really awakened my love of counterpoint and moving voices and just Glenn's sense of rythm is so astonishing and you can't say that about certain classical pianists, they don't really. There's just a joy in his playing.Then Miles Davis 'Friday Night at Tghe Blackhawk. When I listened to that record - that's when I decided I wanted to become a jazz pianist. I loved the fact that it was live, the way Wynton accompanies Miles is incredible, the sense of swing, the fact that it's a live album, it wasn't edited in the studio, you really hear the whole performance. I love that it was Miles's debut with this band - it's the first time they'd ever done a gig and he had the balls to record it and put it out. You know - that's the kind of person he was.Other album? Sonny Rollins Trio - 'Live at The Village Vanguard' with Elvin Jones and Wilbur Ware which I think is kind of the definition of what modern jazz is, and I've listened to that - I think there's two volumes, I've listened to them I don't know how many times.I tell every student I have 'You have to listen to these - this is what jazz improvisation is.'Joni Mitchell's Blue album.  You know, that in a weird way led me toward jazz trying to figure out what the chords she was playing were because they weren't major, they weren't really minor. To a high school ear they were very mysterious. Just the way she tells stories and I've sat a lot of text and she's kind of my guru for how to take a complicated text and make it understandable, set text.  The other album was 'Mingus Mingus Mingus Mingus Mingus which is, to me, - I've sort of talked about it as like Duke Ellington on acid. t's kind of a mid-sized ensemble.It's kind of a mid sized ensemble and the way Mingus and Dannie Richmond play together is kind of miraculous.  And Jaki Byard is on it and I eventually studied with Jaki Byard.  So these were the fiveAnd now I’m down to two.I will probably pick ‘Glen Gould plays Bach’ in the end.  You know Bach is the composer that everybody loves first of all. You can’t not love Bach. There’s not only the most sublime craftsmanship but, as they say, he wrote for the glory of god. Nobody commissioned him to write these pieces he just did this because this is what he did.  And he had twenty two children and he wrote with a quill and ink ... no copying machines and no music notation software - and candles ... and he created all this universe.I think probably a distinctive feature of my jazz playing is its contrapuntal nature and it was really launched by not only listening to these albums, this three disc set I think, but by playing these pieces and understanding how three independent voices can be a whole universe.  The other reason that musicians live Bach is there are no dynamic markings, there are no tempo markings. Very rarely there is a slur or an articulation marking but pretty much you have to do it all yourself. There’s no correct way to do it.  When you’re playing Bach you decide how you’re going to articulate the theme - if it’s a fugue. Nobody can tell you that’s right or wrong and as long as you make a case for it; that this is the way you hear it and you’ve really thought about it and you can execute and really sell your performance. It’s like there’s no perfect Hamlet or there’s no perfect version of 'Autumn Leaves'.  There are many possible versions it’s just they’re templates for whoever inhabits them,  I think Bach’s music is universal in that way.  It’s the music that I always come back to.  So I think that’s what I’m gonna pick.Fred Hesrch: At home, New York City, 3rd October 2018Glen Gould Plays Bach: The Six Partitas, The Two and Three Part InventionsFred Hersch
Fred Hersch: Musician, Glen Gould Plays Bach: The Six Partitas

 

"Well, I had a short list of four - five actually, five. 

One is 'Glenn Gould Plays Bach' and you can see from the rather beat up condition of it. It was a gift to me when it new and I can look at the year, but I was probably not more than six or seven years old when I received that - and it's probably scratched to shit, but it really awakened my love of counterpoint and moving voices and just Glenn's sense of rythm is so astonishing and you can't say that about certain classical pianists, they don't really. There's just a joy in his playing. 

Then Miles Davis 'Friday Night at Tghe Blackhawk. When I listened to that record - that's when I decided I wanted to become a jazz pianist. I loved the fact that it was live, the way Wynton accompanies Miles is incredible, the sense of swing, the fact that it's a live album, it wasn't edited in the studio, you really hear the whole performance. I love that it was Miles's debut with this band - it's the first time they'd ever done a gig and he had the balls to record it and put it out. You know - that's the kind of person he was. 

Other album? Sonny Rollins Trio - 'Live at The Village Vanguard' with Elvin Jones and Wilbur Ware which I think is kind of the definition of what modern jazz is, and I've listened to that - I think there's two volumes, I've listened to them I don't know how many times. 

I tell every student I have 'You have to listen to these - this is what jazz improvisation is.' 

Joni Mitchell's Blue album. You know, that in a weird way led me toward jazz trying to figure out what the chords she was playing were because they weren't major, they weren't really minor. To a high school ear they were very mysterious. Just the way she tells stories and I've sat a lot of text and she's kind of my guru for how to take a complicated text and make it understandable, set text.  

The other album was 'Mingus Mingus Mingus Mingus Mingus which is, to me, - I've sort of talked about it as like Duke Ellington on acid. t's kind of a mid-sized ensemble. 

It's kind of a mid sized ensemble and the way Mingus and Dannie Richmond play together is kind of miraculous. And Jaki Byard is on it and I eventually studied with Jaki Byard. So these were the five 

And now I’m down to two. 

I will probably pick ‘Glen Gould plays Bach’ in the end.  

You know Bach is the composer that everybody loves first of all. You can’t not love Bach. There’s not only the most sublime craftsmanship but, as they say, he wrote for the glory of god. Nobody commissioned him to write these pieces he just did this because this is what he did. And he had twenty two children and he wrote with a quill and ink ... no copying machines and no music notation software - and candles ... and he created all this universe. 

I think probably a distinctive feature of my jazz playing is its contrapuntal nature and it was really launched by not only listening to these albums, this three disc set I think, but by playing these pieces and understanding how three independent voices can be a whole universe.  

The other reason that musicians live Bach is there are no dynamic markings, there are no tempo markings. Very rarely there is a slur or an articulation marking but pretty much you have to do it all yourself. There’s no correct way to do it. When you’re playing Bach you decide how you’re going to articulate the theme - if it’s a fugue. Nobody can tell you that’s right or wrong and as long as you make a case for it; that this is the way you hear it and you’ve really thought about it and you can execute and really sell your performance.  

It’s like there’s no perfect Hamlet or there’s no perfect version of 'Autumn Leaves'. There are many possible versions it’s just they’re templates for whoever inhabits them, I think Bach’s music is universal in that way. It’s the music that I always come back to. So I think that’s what I’m gonna pick. 

Fred Hesrch: At home, New York City, 3rd October 2018 

Glen Gould Plays Bach: The Six Partitas, The Two and Three Part Inventions 

Fred Hersch